We are open and COVIDSafe! Learn More Learn More
All Posts By

Media

wide block 6

What to bring and wear on our Dolphin and Tangalooma Wrecks Cruise

By | Activities

What to bring and wear on our Dolphin and Tangalooma Wrecks Cruise

Cruise with the Experts

Thinking about taking a journey with us to explore the crystal-clear waters of Moreton Bay? Or better yet, have you already booked your cruise? See Moreton offers unique experiences all about flexibility and freedom. We invite you to choose the pace of your day. Want a deeply relaxing day on the water? Done! Or would you prefer a highly active and energetic adventure? It is totally up to you! Just keep reading to find out what you should bring along to your full-day tour with See Moreton. A little preparation makes all the difference.

1. Jacket

No matter the season, it is important to wear a windproof and waterproof jacket when you join us for our Dolphin and Tangalooma Wrecks Cruise. While the sea breeze is refreshing, it can also be a bit cold. In winter, it may be a good idea to wear a beanie and/or scarf too. Remember, you can always take them off, but you cannot wear what you don’t bring! You’ll thank us later.

2. Sunglasses

Sunglasses are a must when you join us on the water. That ocean glare can be intense on both sunny and overcast days. Ensure they have UV protection, and bonus points if they are polarised! Polarised sunnies will really help you see past the glare on the water’s surface. You may even be able to spot some fish swimming below!

3. Sunscreen and a hat

Don’t be fooled by the chilly wind. You are still susceptible to sunburn on our day trip. Make sure you slip, slop, slap with some SPF 30 or 50+, and wear a hat. But be careful – ensure your hat has a drawstring, or hold on tight! Don’t say we didn’t warn you.

4. Swimsuit, boardshorts and a towel

If you’re planning on diving into the heavenly water of Moreton Bay and having a snorkel, it is vital you bring your swimmers and a towel. Trust us – you do not want to have to air dry once you are back on the boat. Remember, that ocean breeze gets chilly! We understand that snorkeling may not be for everyone, so if you don’t plan on taking the plunge you can leave this item off your checklist.

5. Sea sickness tablets

Hopefully you won’t need these, but it’s better to be safe than sorry. A short trip to the pharmacy before you jump on board can save a lot of pain and discomfort later on. Most sea sickness tablets can be purchased over the counter, but make sure you read the packet as they can make some people feel drowsy.

6. Camera (or smartphone)

Last but certainly not least, your trusty camera! Ensure your camera, or other photo-taking device, is fully charged (or bring some spare batteries). Consider sprucing up your camera with a wrist or neck strap. This will help prevent a tragic camera-gone-overboard situation. It also means you will have your hands free to hold onto the rails. Safety first, remember!

photo 1544551763 dbfcd20d8e6c scaled

But most importantly, bring your happy energies and beautiful smiles! While our crew will be providing this in abundance, bringing your own is guaranteed to level up your day. We, at See Moreton, look forward to showing you the magic of Moreton Bay very soon.

More Like This

wide block 6
Activities

What to bring and wear on our Dolphin and Tangalooma Wrecks Cruise

Thinking about taking a journey with us to explore the crystal-clear waters of Moreton Bay?…
advanced ecotourism certified new
Responsible Tourism

ECO Certified Advanced Tourism: What does it mean?

Have you been travelling in Australia? If so, it is likely you have seen the…
TTC02226
Activities

Under the sea: A beginners guide to snorkelling

The Tangalooma Wrecks are one of Australia’s best snorkelling locations, and lucky for you, See…
advanced ecotourism certified new

ECO Certified Advanced Tourism: What does it mean?

By | Responsible Tourism

ECO Certified Advanced Tourism: What does it mean?

advanced ecotourism certified new

Have you been travelling in Australia? If so, it is likely you have seen the ECO Certified Tourism logo. Almost 500 tourism businesses, including See Moreton, proudly showcase this logo on their vessels, windows and uniforms. But do you actually know what it means? Don’t worry – we’ve got you covered! Keep reading to find out everything you need to know about this small but mighty logo. And don’t forget to look out for it when you spend the day with us!

Who is behind ECO Certification?

ECO Certification is the oldest national ecotourism accreditation initiative in the world! It is a program developed by Ecotourism Australia, who are a world renowned non-profit organisation dedicated to environmentally and culturally responsible tourism. They encourage nature-based tourism companies to become ECO Certified, so travellers can be sure their holiday experiences are healthy for our planet.

wide block 8

How does a tourism business become certified?

The ECO Certification program certifies tourism products that focus on nature. When you see this logo, you can trust that the business is doing the right thing by the environment, its ecosystems and its communities. Businesses, like See Moreton, are well managed and committed to sustainable practices. It also guarantees the tourism experiences on offer are authentic and of high quality.

The Tangalooma Wrecks

What are See Moreton’s eco practices?

We at See Moreton are committed to minimising environmental impact by reducing waste, teaching guests about how to protect our oceans and supporting local initiatives. We show our travellers the beauty of the marine environment and its many, magical creatures. We offer a culturally safe experience in which we acknowledge the Quandamooka People as the rightful owners of the island, Mulgumpin (Moreton Island).

 

Now that you know a little bit more about the ECO Certification, be sure to look out for it when you are travelling next. See Moreton is dedicated to not only showcasing the magical wonders of nature with our passengers, but also ensuring these wonders are cared for well into the future. And we hope you are too. We want future generations to be able to enjoy the same natural wonders as we do now. So what are you waiting for? Come and appreciate the beauty of Moreton Island with us!

More Like This

wide block 6
Activities

What to bring and wear on our Dolphin and Tangalooma Wrecks Cruise

Thinking about taking a journey with us to explore the crystal-clear waters of Moreton Bay?…
advanced ecotourism certified new
Responsible Tourism

ECO Certified Advanced Tourism: What does it mean?

Have you been travelling in Australia? If so, it is likely you have seen the…
TTC02226
Activities

Under the sea: A beginners guide to snorkelling

The Tangalooma Wrecks are one of Australia’s best snorkelling locations, and lucky for you, See…
TTC02226

Under the sea: A beginners guide to snorkelling

By | Activities

Under the sea: A beginners guide to snorkelling

TTC02226

The Tangalooma Wrecks are one of Australia’s best snorkelling locations, and lucky for you, See Moreton can take you right there! Take a journey with us to the pristine waters of Moreton Bay Marine Park. Our full-day tours offer time to snorkel around the underwater paradise of the wrecks. The crystal clear water surrounding the wrecks are home to over 200 species of fish and over 130 species of coral, attracting marine life big and small. The snorkel experience we offer is extremely safe and all snorkelling equipment is provided. 

 

Unlike scuba diving, snorkelling requires no formal training and no heavy equipment. That being said, poor first-time snorkelling experiences are common. Nervousness, foggy masks, water flooding your snorkel and uncomfortable fins can tarnish the beauty and magic of your experience. So, below you will find a few helpful tips that will help you avoid these common beginner mistakes and ensure you have the experience of a lifetime with See Moreton!

1. Choose wisely

Choosing equipment that fits you well is paramount to the success of your snorkelling endeavour. Having gear that is too big or too small creates numerous issues and problems. It is helpful to know your shoe size before you come on tour with us. As for fitting a mask, a simple test is to place it up against your face without using the strap, suck gently through your nose, and then let go of the mask. If it has made a good seal it will stay on your face for a couple of seconds. If this happens, then you have successfully found a properly fitting mask!

As for fins, they should be snug but not so much that they hurt your feet. Fins that are too loose can give you blisters from chafing. Start by choosing a set of fins based on your shoe size, and then try one of the fins on and do the shake test. Sit down and shake your foot in all directions! If there is absolutely no movement and it feels too tight, size up. If it is shaking and wobbling then you need to size down.

2. Learn the basics

Learning basic mask and snorkel skills before you jump on board with us is likely to enhance your snorkelling adventure. We suggest watching a few videos online about how to clear your snorkel and how to easily get water out of your mask. When you get your equipment from us, breathe through the snorkel a couple of times before you get in the water. It can be a weird feeling for those who have never snorkelled before! Another tip is to avoid exhaling through your nose when you have the mask on. This will make your mask foggy beyond belief!

3. Keep calm and carry on

Staying relaxed and reducing your effort is one of the biggest tips we can offer! The key to a fun snorkelling experience to stay cool, calm and collected. Swim slowly, take deep breaths and simply enjoy the moment. Floating on the water’s surface while you gaze at colourful corals and happily swimming fish can be very therapeutic, if you let it! The best way to conserve energy is to keep your arms relaxed and by your sides, and only use your legs to propel yourself forward (by kicking slowly). This is what the fins are for, after all. 

More like this

wide block 6
Activities

What to bring and wear on our Dolphin and Tangalooma Wrecks Cruise

Thinking about taking a journey with us to explore the crystal-clear waters of Moreton Bay?…
advanced ecotourism certified new
Responsible Tourism

ECO Certified Advanced Tourism: What does it mean?

Have you been travelling in Australia? If so, it is likely you have seen the…
TTC02226
Activities

Under the sea: A beginners guide to snorkelling

The Tangalooma Wrecks are one of Australia’s best snorkelling locations, and lucky for you, See…
TTC00268

From Moreton to Mulgumpin: The island rightfully returns to Traditional Custodians

By | The Island

From Moreton to Mulgumpin: The island rightfully returns to Traditional Custodians

TTC00268

The Quandamooka Coast (Redlands Coast) is home to the Quandamooka People, the Traditional Custodians of the land and sea that surrounds Minjerribah (North Stradbroke Island) and Mulgumpin (Moreton Island). Before we continue, See Moreton would like to respectfully acknowledge the Quandamooka People and their continued care and ownership of the islands and their surroundings. We, at See Moreton, would like to pay respect to their Elders past, present and emerging. We encourage you to do the same when you participate in our sustainable, informative and breathtaking tours of the Quandamooka Coast.

The Quandamooka People represent three distinct, yet closely connected, groups: the Ngugi People, the Nunukul People, and the Gorenpul People. Moreton Island is home to the Ngugi People, who call Moreton Island by its Jandai name, Mulgumpin, meaning ‘place of sandhills.’ The Quandamooka People maintain a continuous connection with the land and seaways around Mulgumpin. They continue to listen to nature and observe the seasons, and they urge visitors to Mulgumpin to do the same.

On 27 November 2019, Quandamooka native title was recognised for Mulgumpin (Moreton Island). This is a wonderful and momentous decision and acknowledges the expertise of the Quandamooka People to care for their beautiful sand island that we all know and love. Mulgumpin will continue to offer a national park, sand island experience on south east Queensland’s doorstep while also enabling the Quandamooka People to be directly involved in the island’s management. The partnership between the Quandamooka People and the Queensland Government will allow the island’s natural and cultural values to be showcased in a culturally sensitive way, delivering ecotourism opportunities and experiences from a First Nations perspective. We look forward to continuing our learning journey by listening to the knowledge of the Quandamooka People.

More like this

wide block 6
Activities

What to bring and wear on our Dolphin and Tangalooma Wrecks Cruise

Thinking about taking a journey with us to explore the crystal-clear waters of Moreton Bay?…
advanced ecotourism certified new
Responsible Tourism

ECO Certified Advanced Tourism: What does it mean?

Have you been travelling in Australia? If so, it is likely you have seen the…
TTC02226
Activities

Under the sea: A beginners guide to snorkelling

The Tangalooma Wrecks are one of Australia’s best snorkelling locations, and lucky for you, See…
TTC00255

Dougie: Our favourite dugong

By | Wildlife

Dougie: Our favourite dugong

TTC00255

A day out to the Tangalooma Wrecks site at Moreton Island will be a fun-filled adventure you won’t soon forget! You will come face to face with a variety of marine creatures – ranging from colourful marine reef fish swimming in formation, live corals and strange looking starfish and sea urchins hiding amongst the reef. If you are lucky you may spot a green sea turtle gliding through the water or having a snooze on the sandy bottom. Pods of dolphins can also be encountered and, because they are naturally curious, they often swim very close to the boat and playfully ride the bow wave. Don’t forget your camera!

An encounter with one of the dugongs that call Moreton Bay home may well be on the cards. But don’t forget, dugongs are shy in nature and can be elusive. This just makes spotting one all the more exciting! Dugongs spend the majority of their days swimming peacefully through the shallows searching for food and munching on seagrass. They venture to the surface to breathe and have a quick look around, but unfortunately their eyesight is considered poor. Our crew will be on high alert – using their well-trained eyes to look for subtle clues that a dugong is nearby. As they search the shallow waters for these timid creatures often the first thing they see is a big brown or grey snout poking above the water. Dugongs surface with their snout to easily exhale and then take in a breath of fresh air. If you look closely you may see all the whiskers (vibrissae) around their mouth. Next, you may see a broad back break the water’s surface. If you see long scratches along the back, you have most likely spotted an adult female dugong.

 

The most well-known resident dugong we encounter on our tours is Dougie the dugong! His home range surrounds the Tangalooma Wrecks, and he is often seen patrolling for any adult females venturing into his territory. Dougie is always keen to meet (and chase!) the local females. Dougie, like other mature male dugongs, has two small tusks in his mouth. He can use these to compete with other males in his bid to win over a female. If Dougie wins the match, he will begin courting the adult female, and he will use his tusks to give her a back scratch, covering her back with marks. If you are lucky enough to see Dougie, have a good look to see if he has any fresh tusk wounds from recent battles with other males.

 

Each day, Dougie will spend most of his time diving to the seafloor to search for, locate and then slurp up patches of seagrass. He uses the sensitive bristles arranged around his upper lip to find, grasp and pull up seagrasses by their roots. Dougie, like other dugongs, uses his whiskers and snout like a vacuum, leaving the sandy bottom covered with track lines. Recent research tells us that dugongs are not herbivores, as was previously thought. They are mostly vegetarian, with the majority of their diet consisting of seagrasses. However, scientists have learned that dugongs will also snack on tiny creatures living along the sandy bottom (macro-invertebrates), such as ascidians (or sea squirts). Dougie may live to be 70 years old, grow to 3 metres in length and tip the scales at 400 kg.

 

Moreton Bay’s dugong population is thought to be somewhere between 600 and 800. This population is special for several reasons. Firstly, it is considered the largest population of dugongs living so close to a big city like Brisbane. Secondly, the Moreton Bay dugong population is located at the southern limit to their range on the east coast of Australia. Dugongs prefer warmer water temperatures and in Moreton Bay the sea surface temperature ranges from a chilly 18.0°C in winter to a cosy 27.0°C in summer. Thirdly, dugongs are quite rare around the globe, partly because they reach maturity late in life and don’t breed extensively. Also, they are heavily reliant on seagrass beds being plentiful and healthy, which requires good water quality and low pollution levels. Sadly, dugongs are classified as vulnerable in Queensland waters. So be sure to give Dougie a wave if you are lucky enough to see him!

More like this

wide block 6
Activities

What to bring and wear on our Dolphin and Tangalooma Wrecks Cruise

Thinking about taking a journey with us to explore the crystal-clear waters of Moreton Bay?…
advanced ecotourism certified new
Responsible Tourism

ECO Certified Advanced Tourism: What does it mean?

Have you been travelling in Australia? If so, it is likely you have seen the…
TTC02226
Activities

Under the sea: A beginners guide to snorkelling

The Tangalooma Wrecks are one of Australia’s best snorkelling locations, and lucky for you, See…
TTC00377

The wonderful wildlife of Moreton Island: Animals you are likely to see on a trip with us

By | Wildlife

The wonderful wildlife of Moreton Island: Animals you are likely to see on a trip with us

TTC00377

Home to the famed Tangalooma Wrecks and a world-renowned destination for encountering dolphins, dugongs and sea turtles, a cruise to Moreton Island is a nature lover’s dream. See Moreton’s onboard marine naturalists have been working with the incredible animals for over a decade and have the experience to give you the closest wildlife encounters possible. Here’s what to look out for…

Bottlenose dolphins

Moreton Bay’s friendliest residents are undoubtedly the dolphins. Moreton Bay Marine Park is home to two dolphin species: the Indo-pacific bottlenose dolphin and the Australian humpback dolphin. Dolphins are highly intelligent, social creatures that are known for their playful and interactive encounters with people. Bottlenose dolphins are commonly found swimming within the surrounds of Moreton Bay and an encounter with them will likely be a joyous one, for their friendly nature leads them to deliberately seek out human interaction. They have a short, thick beak and a curved mouth, giving the appearance that they are always smiling. As social creatures, they travel in pods of around 10 to 15 dolphins. Find them frolicking around the Tangalooma Wrecks, particularly in the afternoon.

 

Australian humpback dolphins

If you’re really lucky, you may spot the rare Australian humpback dolphin, whose population is estimated to number less than 100. This dolphin was only described as a separate species in 2014. They get their name from their elongated dorsal fin and humpback appearance, which arises from the accumulation of fatty tissue on their backs as they age. Their mounded forehead and long beaks also differentiate them from other dolphin species. Lucky for us, they are mostly found in shallow nearshore waters, often at the mouths of estuaries and in tidal channels. They are often observed in smaller groups of 2 to 4 and, unlike bottlenose dolphins, do not bow ride. Instead, they like to leap clear from the water! Search for splashes and dorsal fins breaking the water’s surface.

 

Dugongs

The dugong is the only plant-eating mammal that lives its entire life in the water. They have been nicknamed “sea cows” by some, as they are slow moving and spend most of their day feeding on seagrass. Intriguingly, dugongs are more closely related to elephants than any other marine animal. Dugongs have relatively poor eyesight, so they rely on the sensitive bristles covering their snouts to find and grasp seagrass. They may live up to 70 years and are slow breeders – female dugongs not breeding until they are at least 10 to 17 years old. Moreton Bay Marine Park is the southern limit of dugong activity along the east coast of Australia, and is home to approximately 600 to 800 of these gentle sea creatures. If you are lucky enough to spot a dugong, chances are it’s our resident local, Dougie!

 

Sea turtles

Six out of the world’s seven species of sea turtles can be found in Moreton Bay. This is a pretty special feat considering the island is so close to a capital city. Those most commonly seen on a visit to Moreton Island include green turtles, loggerhead turtles and hawksbill turtles. Moreton Island’s seagrass meadows provide local turtles with the ultimate dining experience. Green turtles will feast on the seagrass meadows themselves, while loggerheads will munch on the shellfish, sea urchins, crabs and jellyfish that call the meadows home. Turtles are extraordinary navigators and often nest at the same beaches they were hatched. While they do spend a lot of time napping on the seafloor, they occasionally venture up to the surface for air – and to say hello to us, of course! Listen out for squeals of delight from passengers when one is spotted.

 

Birds

Over 180 species of birds have been recorded from Moreton Island, including pelicans, sea eagles, brahminy kites and pied cormorants. Many of these birds are rescue animals that have been saved and released onto the island. Australian pelicans are one of the largest flying birds in the world, and hold the record for the longest beak! Sea eagles are large birds of prey with big, hooked beaks for catching fish. Spot these birds flying high in the sky in circular motions. Brahminy kites are also birds of prey, often seen perched for long periods of time before swooping down onto prey in the water or ground. Pied cormorants are pro fish hunters, plunging themselves deep into the water when chasing prey. They may even eat the fish underwater! Be sure to say hello to our favourite pied cormorant, Georgie. And don’t worry – she isn’t camera shy.

 

Fish

Moreton Island is a haven for over 100 unique species of fish, including mullet, crescent perch and southern soft-spined sunfish. Luckily for us, the island’s subtropical climate means we see both tropical and temperate varieties of fish. The diversity is truly incredible. Witness it for yourself on the snorkelling tour, and during fish feeding.

Although not an extensive list of all the wonderful creatures that call Moreton Island home, this list provides a starting point and guide for the animals you may want to keep a lookout for while on your Dolphin & Tangalooma Wrecks Cruise with See Moreton. Spot dolphins, dugongs and turtles on a See Moreton Marine Discovery Cruise and meet Georgie the cormorant, who will be there waiting to snag up some food during your fish feeding session. With our expert tour guides and marine naturalists, you are bound to experience the best of Moreton Island. Just remember, keep your eyes open and your cameras ready!

More like this

wide block 6
Activities

What to bring and wear on our Dolphin and Tangalooma Wrecks Cruise

Thinking about taking a journey with us to explore the crystal-clear waters of Moreton Bay?…
advanced ecotourism certified new
Responsible Tourism

ECO Certified Advanced Tourism: What does it mean?

Have you been travelling in Australia? If so, it is likely you have seen the…
TTC02226
Activities

Under the sea: A beginners guide to snorkelling

The Tangalooma Wrecks are one of Australia’s best snorkelling locations, and lucky for you, See…