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Responsible Tourism

TTC00051 sustainable tourism

5 rules to keep in mind to practice sustainable tourism

By | Responsible Tourism

5 rules to keep in mind to practice sustainable tourism

Responsible Tourism
TTC00051 sustainable tourism

It is easier than you think to be a responsible and eco-friendly tourist. You don’t need to book a wind-powered cabin or eat strictly organic produce. It is easy to do small actions that help produce a positive and sustainable future for the place you are visiting.

What is sustainable tourism?

Like responsible tourism, sustainable tourism relies on the premise of taking care of the environment, society, and economy. Sustainable tourism principles intend to minimixe the negative impacts of tourism whilst maximixing the positive effects.

Before we continue, See Moreton would like to respectfully acknowledge the people of Quandamooka and their continued care and ownership of the islands and their surroundings. We, at See Moreton, would like to pay respect to their Elders past, present, and emerging. We encourage you to do the same when participating in our sustainable, informative, and breathtaking tours of the Quandamooka Coast.

Reef-friendly slip, slop, slap!

Did you know that most sunscreens contain Oxybenzone and Octinoxate, two ingredients that are harmful to our oceans? Scientists have recorded that up to 6,000 tons of sunscreen are washed into coral reefs around the world each year, advancing the coral bleaching process and killing marine ecosystems.

When choosing a reef-friendly sunscreen, look out for mineral sunscreens with zinc oxide and titanium dioxide, avoiding anything with parabens or in an aerosol can.

Reduce, reuse, recycle

Disposing of waste in the correct bin is an important practise that can be done every day. Our vessel Spirit of Migaloo II has recently installed three brightly coloured recycling bins for general waste, food scraps and recycling. Sorting rubbish into the right bin means that it is going to the right places and not straight into a landfill. Food waste is excellent for composting and giving nutrients to the soil.

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Marine life, such as turtles, mistake plastic in the ocean as a source of food. Be careful not to throw your rubbish overboard!

Do not disturb

It is a good practice to be mindful when you travel to new destinations. Moreton Island (Mulgumpin) and the Tangalooma Wrecks are beautiful locations in South-East Queensland however they are a national park and should be treated with care. When you are snorkeling, avoid touching any wildlife or their coral homes. They are part of an ecosystem and any damage or interference can disturb the natural order and put their survival at risk. The reefs and their inhabitants are just as beautiful, even if you can’t feel them.

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When snorkeling, avoid leaning or resting on coral (it’s delicate).

Don’t throw waste overboard – keep it with you!

As the famous saying goes, ‘”take only memories, leave nothing but footprints”. Just as you wouldn’t like someone visiting your house and leaving it trashed, take back anything you brought with you to your destination. Any trash or non-perishable items you accumulate can be either disposed of correctly or put into your bag or pocket for later.

Do your part in helping the environment by picking up and removing any rubbish you find, leaving the location better than when you found it.

Respecting culture and heritage

Sustainable tourism is not only just about the environment but is a way to respect and maintain cultural values, diversity, and heritage for the location. At See Moreton, we acknowledge the original owners of Moreton Island (Mulgumpin), the Quandamooka people, by saying the Acknowledgement of Country on every tour and using indigenous words during onboard commentary.

Ecotourism Australia Certification

Choose tour companies with an Ecotourism certification. ECO Certification is the oldest national ecotourism accreditation initiative in the world. It is a program developed by Ecotourism Australia, which is a world-renowned non-profit organization dedicated to environmentally and culturally responsible tourism. Their mission is to encourage nature and wildlife tourism businesses to be sustainable and environmentally friendly, just like See Moreton. This helps consumers know that they are making a better choice for the environment when deciding on their holiday activities. 

We hope this helps you be a more proactive and responsible traveler. Remember, one small act like picking up a piece of rubbish can make a huge difference.

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ECO Certified Advanced Tourism: What does it mean?

By | Blog, Responsible Tourism

ECO Certified Advanced Tourism: What does it mean?

advanced ecotourism certified new

Have you been travelling in Australia? If so, it is likely you have seen the ECO Certified Tourism logo. Almost 500 tourism businesses, including See Moreton, proudly showcase this logo on their vessels, windows and uniforms. But do you actually know what it means? Don’t worry – we’ve got you covered! Keep reading to find out everything you need to know about this small but mighty logo. And don’t forget to look out for it when you spend the day with us!

Who is behind ECO Certification?

ECO Certification is the oldest national ecotourism accreditation initiative in the world! It is a program developed by Ecotourism Australia, who are a world renowned non-profit organisation dedicated to environmentally and culturally responsible tourism. They encourage nature-based tourism companies to become ECO Certified, so travellers can be sure their holiday experiences are healthy for our planet.

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How does a tourism business become certified?

The ECO Certification program certifies tourism products that focus on nature. When you see this logo, you can trust that the business is doing the right thing by the environment, its ecosystems and its communities. Businesses, like See Moreton, are well managed and committed to sustainable practices. It also guarantees the tourism experiences on offer are authentic and of high quality.

The Tangalooma Wrecks

What are See Moreton’s eco practices?

We at See Moreton are committed to minimising environmental impact by reducing waste, teaching guests about how to protect our oceans and supporting local initiatives. We show our travellers the beauty of the marine environment and its many, magical creatures. We offer a culturally safe experience in which we acknowledge the Quandamooka People as the rightful owners of the island, Mulgumpin (Moreton Island).

 

Now that you know a little bit more about the ECO Certification, be sure to look out for it when you are travelling next. See Moreton is dedicated to not only showcasing the magical wonders of nature with our passengers, but also ensuring these wonders are cared for well into the future. And we hope you are too. We want future generations to be able to enjoy the same natural wonders as we do now. So what are you waiting for? Come and appreciate the beauty of Moreton Island with us!

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From Moreton to Mulgumpin: The island rightfully returns to Traditional Custodians

By | Blog, Activities, Responsible Tourism, The Island, Wildlife

From Moreton to Mulgumpin: The island rightfully returns to Traditional Custodians

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The Quandamooka Coast (Redlands Coast) is home to the Quandamooka People, the Traditional Custodians of the land and sea that surrounds Minjerribah (North Stradbroke Island) and Mulgumpin (Moreton Island). Before we continue, See Moreton would like to respectfully acknowledge the Quandamooka People and their continued care and ownership of the islands and their surroundings. We, at See Moreton, would like to pay respect to their Elders past, present and emerging. We encourage you to do the same when you participate in our sustainable, informative and breathtaking tours of the Quandamooka Coast.

The Quandamooka People represent three distinct, yet closely connected, groups: the Ngugi People, the Nunukul People, and the Gorenpul People. Moreton Island is home to the Ngugi People, who call Moreton Island by its Jandai name, Mulgumpin, meaning ‘place of sandhills.’ The Quandamooka People maintain a continuous connection with the land and seaways around Mulgumpin. They continue to listen to nature and observe the seasons, and they urge visitors to Mulgumpin to do the same.

On 27 November 2019, Quandamooka native title was recognised for Mulgumpin (Moreton Island). This is a wonderful and momentous decision and acknowledges the expertise of the Quandamooka People to care for their beautiful sand island that we all know and love. Mulgumpin will continue to offer a national park, sand island experience on south east Queensland’s doorstep while also enabling the Quandamooka People to be directly involved in the island’s management. The partnership between the Quandamooka People and the Queensland Government will allow the island’s natural and cultural values to be showcased in a culturally sensitive way, delivering ecotourism opportunities and experiences from a First Nations perspective. We look forward to continuing our learning journey by listening to the knowledge of the Quandamooka People.

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