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Beginners Guide to Snorkelling

By | Blog, Activities

Beginners Guide to Snorkelling

Activities
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Snorkelling at the Tangalooma Wrecks at Moreton Island (Mulgumpin) is the highlight of your See Moreton Tour. The decades-old shipwrecks provide a beautiful and unique location to visit and explore in South East Queensland.
We asked our passionate snorkel guides to share their best tips for avoiding common snorkelling mistakes and having the best time possible.

Goggles and snorkels and masks, oh my!

Familiarise yourself with the snorkelling equipment you’ll be kitted out with at the Tangalooma Wrecks. The crew will have a thorough safety brief with every group before we reach Moreton Island. This gives you time to ask questions and learn all you need to know about the Tangalooma Wrecks snorkel site.

Essential snorkelling gear includes:

Snorkel Goggle/Mask

It takes a little bit to get used to a snorkel mask. You will be given a mask as we cruise to Moreton Island, and our friendly crew will help you fit it properly. It is best to get accustomed to your mask before you head out to the Tangalooma Wrecks, so you are ready to jump in without any concern about your mask falling off or feeling too tight.

Snorkel

What is snorkelling without a snorkel! This piece of equipment is fitted into your mouth and enables you to breathe underwater.

Swim Fins

Fins are a fun necessity when you snorkel. They help you swim faster and conserve energy during your underwater adventure.

Protective Glove

The Tangalooma Wrecks are over 40 years old and, over time, have become fragile to the touch. We supply protective gloves to help you safely push off the wrecks to avoid the risk of cuts or gashes.

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Our professional snorkelling guides will help answer all your snorkel questions.

Lead the way!

Every tour will have two experienced snorkel guides to offer the most exciting and comfortable snorkelling experience.

If you aren’t the most confident swimmer, don’t worry, we have plenty of ways to help you enjoy your time at the Tangalooma Wrecks.

We have different types of floatation devices available to use, including life jackets and pool noodles. The pool noodle is a crew favourite as it helps you glide across the water without using too much energy.

What the fog?

One of the most common issues that happen when snorkelling is when your mask fogs up.

To defog your mask, come up for air and either tread water or find a guide (who will be swimming with a lifebuoy) to hold onto. Take the mask off and use your saliva on the glasses. Rinse off with the ocean water and avoid breathing on it as you put the mask back on.

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Breath in, breath out

Snorkels can appear daunting for those who haven’t used them before. Remember always to keep the top of the snorkel afloat, and if you accidentally breathe in the water, don’t panic! Simply blow it out, a bit like how dolphins and whales exhale water from their blowhole!

Capture Memories

Although you can’t touch the coral or wildlife, you can capture the memories of the experience and vibrant environment with an underwater camera. We have all-day GoPro hire available on board which includes a take-home SD card.

*GoPro hire is an additional cost of $50

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Be the envy of all your friends with awesome underwater footage using our GoPros!

No touching!

A key thing to remember when snorkelling is NOT to touch anything. As mentioned above, the Tangalooma Wrecks and the ecosystem within it are very fragile. Not only can coral be incredibly sharp, but it is also very delicate and essential for the survival of the marine life that calls it home. Coral grows at an incredibly slow average rate of 0.5-1 inch of growth a year.

You can enjoy the reef and the vibrant wildlife without touching it, protecting it for future generations to come.

Test out your snorkelling skills and see the beautiful Tangalooma Wrecks for yourself.

Book Now

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Why a day trip to Moreton Island (Mulgumpin) is the perfect family outing

By | Activities, Blog

Why a day trip to Moreton Island (Mulgumpin) is the perfect family outing

Activities
TTC00363LR Moreton Island

Imagine this… You’re bathed in sunshine on a tranquil island. You’re sipping an ice-cold drink as the little ones keep themselves entertained in the golden sand. Picture yourself snorkelling in pristine, crystal clear water with vibrant fish swimming past you. The kids swim beside you, pointing out the turtle hiding in the seagrass. No bored kids, no bustling shopping centres, just you and your family enjoying paradise above and below the sea. This isn’t a scene from your dreams; tropical bliss is waiting for you just a short boat ride away from Brisbane.

See Moreton’s Dolphin & Tangalooma Wrecks Cruise to Moreton Island (Mulgumpin) is the perfect family outing. Your children won’t be able to wait to share it with their friends at school. We list below the top four reasons why a visit to Moreton Island is a must for you and your family

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1. Discover the Mystery of the Tangalooma Wrecks

Snorkelling is the highlight of your See Moreton Dolphin and Tangalooma Wreck tour. It’s the perfect family activity as you explore the hidden world beneath pristine waters. Help find a variety of colourful fish, vibrant corals and if you’re lucky, spot a turtle or two! Suitable for first-timers, our professional snorkel guides are with you every step of the way. They are more than happy to help your children learn how to use a snorkel and fins. By the end of their adventure, they’ll be water experts.

Snorkelling at the Wrecks is recommended for children aged 6 and up. Younger children are welcome to snorkel under competent adult supervision during free beach time. All snorkelling equipment is supplied.

2. Let Us Handle Lunch

The best part of this mini-vacay? We handle lunch with a mouth-watering tropical buffet. Enjoy every moment with your family as you indulge in a chef prepared feast. We offer locally caught, fresh trawler prawns, tender roast chicken, delicious maple-glazed ham off the bone alongside an assortment of salads and sides. To top it all off, with sliced seasonal melons and tropical fruits.

TTC02940 scaled Moreton Island

3. A Slice of Sandy Paradise

Now it’s time to put your feet up. Moreton Island boasts beautiful, golden beaches, all of which are yours to enjoy. Do as much or as little as you please. Bask in the sun and cosy up with a good book or build an impressive sandcastle. See Moreton supplies a variety of sports equipment such as beach cricket and beach soccer. There is plenty to keep the kids busy as you relax and live on island time.

4. Putting the Wild in Wildlife

How many kids can put up their hand and say they saw dolphins, turtles, or even dugongs? Moreton Island is home to an abundance of wildlife. Your kids can become part of the crew as we look out for creatures in the water. The best way to find spot wildlife is to look out for shadows; if the shadow is darker than others in the water, there’s a good chance it’s something exciting. Our favourite creature to keep an eye out for is Dougie, the resident dugong who spends most of his time munching on seagrass. He loves popping up to say hello to passengers, so don’t forget to wave!

So what are you waiting for? Throw your swimwear into a bag and embark on an epic family day out at Moreton Island. Book your tickets today!

BOOK NOW

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What to bring and wear on our Dolphin and Tangalooma Wrecks Cruise

By | Activities

What to bring and wear on our Dolphin and Tangalooma Wrecks Cruise

Cruise with the Experts

Thinking about taking a journey with us to explore the crystal-clear waters of Moreton Bay? Or better yet, have you already booked your cruise? See Moreton offers unique experiences all about flexibility and freedom. We invite you to choose the pace of your day. Want a deeply relaxing day on the water? Done! Or would you prefer a highly active and energetic adventure? It is totally up to you! Just keep reading to find out what you should bring along to your full-day tour with See Moreton. A little preparation makes all the difference.

1. Jacket

No matter the season, it is important to wear a windproof and waterproof jacket when you join us for our Dolphin and Tangalooma Wrecks Cruise. While the sea breeze is refreshing, it can also be a bit cold. In winter, it may be a good idea to wear a beanie and/or scarf too. Remember, you can always take them off, but you cannot wear what you don’t bring! You’ll thank us later.

2. Sunglasses

Sunglasses are a must when you join us on the water. That ocean glare can be intense on both sunny and overcast days. Ensure they have UV protection, and bonus points if they are polarised! Polarised sunnies will really help you see past the glare on the water’s surface. You may even be able to spot some fish swimming below!

3. Sunscreen and a hat

Don’t be fooled by the chilly wind. You are still susceptible to sunburn on our day trip. Make sure you slip, slop, slap with some SPF 30 or 50+, and wear a hat. But be careful – ensure your hat has a drawstring, or hold on tight! Don’t say we didn’t warn you.

4. Swimsuit, boardshorts and a towel

If you’re planning on diving into the heavenly water of Moreton Bay and having a snorkel, it is vital you bring your swimmers and a towel. Trust us – you do not want to have to air dry once you are back on the boat. Remember, that ocean breeze gets chilly! We understand that snorkeling may not be for everyone, so if you don’t plan on taking the plunge you can leave this item off your checklist.

5. Sea sickness tablets

Hopefully you won’t need these, but it’s better to be safe than sorry. A short trip to the pharmacy before you jump on board can save a lot of pain and discomfort later on. Most sea sickness tablets can be purchased over the counter, but make sure you read the packet as they can make some people feel drowsy.

6. Camera (or smartphone)

Last but certainly not least, your trusty camera! Ensure your camera, or other photo-taking device, is fully charged (or bring some spare batteries). Consider sprucing up your camera with a wrist or neck strap. This will help prevent a tragic camera-gone-overboard situation. It also means you will have your hands free to hold onto the rails. Safety first, remember!

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But most importantly, bring your happy energies and beautiful smiles! While our crew will be providing this in abundance, bringing your own is guaranteed to level up your day. We, at See Moreton, look forward to showing you the magic of Moreton Bay very soon.

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Under the sea: A beginners guide to snorkelling

By | Activities, Blog

Under the sea: A beginners guide to snorkelling

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The Tangalooma Wrecks are one of Australia’s best snorkelling locations, and lucky for you, See Moreton can take you right there! Take a journey with us to the pristine waters of Moreton Bay Marine Park. Our full-day tours offer time to snorkel around the underwater paradise of the wrecks. The crystal clear water surrounding the wrecks are home to over 200 species of fish and over 130 species of coral, attracting marine life big and small. The snorkel experience we offer is extremely safe and all snorkelling equipment is provided. 

 

Unlike scuba diving, snorkelling requires no formal training and no heavy equipment. That being said, poor first-time snorkelling experiences are common. Nervousness, foggy masks, water flooding your snorkel and uncomfortable fins can tarnish the beauty and magic of your experience. So, below you will find a few helpful tips that will help you avoid these common beginner mistakes and ensure you have the experience of a lifetime with See Moreton!

1. Choose wisely

Choosing equipment that fits you well is paramount to the success of your snorkelling endeavour. Having gear that is too big or too small creates numerous issues and problems. It is helpful to know your shoe size before you come on tour with us. As for fitting a mask, a simple test is to place it up against your face without using the strap, suck gently through your nose, and then let go of the mask. If it has made a good seal it will stay on your face for a couple of seconds. If this happens, then you have successfully found a properly fitting mask!

As for fins, they should be snug but not so much that they hurt your feet. Fins that are too loose can give you blisters from chafing. Start by choosing a set of fins based on your shoe size, and then try one of the fins on and do the shake test. Sit down and shake your foot in all directions! If there is absolutely no movement and it feels too tight, size up. If it is shaking and wobbling then you need to size down.

2. Learn the basics

Learning basic mask and snorkel skills before you jump on board with us is likely to enhance your snorkelling adventure. We suggest watching a few videos online about how to clear your snorkel and how to easily get water out of your mask. When you get your equipment from us, breathe through the snorkel a couple of times before you get in the water. It can be a weird feeling for those who have never snorkelled before! Another tip is to avoid exhaling through your nose when you have the mask on. This will make your mask foggy beyond belief!

3. Keep calm and carry on

Staying relaxed and reducing your effort is one of the biggest tips we can offer! The key to a fun snorkelling experience to stay cool, calm and collected. Swim slowly, take deep breaths and simply enjoy the moment. Floating on the water’s surface while you gaze at colourful corals and happily swimming fish can be very therapeutic, if you let it! The best way to conserve energy is to keep your arms relaxed and by your sides, and only use your legs to propel yourself forward (by kicking slowly). This is what the fins are for, after all. 

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From Moreton to Mulgumpin: The island rightfully returns to Traditional Custodians

By | Blog, Activities, Responsible Tourism, The Island, Wildlife

From Moreton to Mulgumpin: The island rightfully returns to Traditional Custodians

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The Quandamooka Coast (Redlands Coast) is home to the Quandamooka People, the Traditional Custodians of the land and sea that surrounds Minjerribah (North Stradbroke Island) and Mulgumpin (Moreton Island). Before we continue, See Moreton would like to respectfully acknowledge the Quandamooka People and their continued care and ownership of the islands and their surroundings. We, at See Moreton, would like to pay respect to their Elders past, present and emerging. We encourage you to do the same when you participate in our sustainable, informative and breathtaking tours of the Quandamooka Coast.

The Quandamooka People represent three distinct, yet closely connected, groups: the Ngugi People, the Nunukul People, and the Gorenpul People. Moreton Island is home to the Ngugi People, who call Moreton Island by its Jandai name, Mulgumpin, meaning ‘place of sandhills.’ The Quandamooka People maintain a continuous connection with the land and seaways around Mulgumpin. They continue to listen to nature and observe the seasons, and they urge visitors to Mulgumpin to do the same.

On 27 November 2019, Quandamooka native title was recognised for Mulgumpin (Moreton Island). This is a wonderful and momentous decision and acknowledges the expertise of the Quandamooka People to care for their beautiful sand island that we all know and love. Mulgumpin will continue to offer a national park, sand island experience on south east Queensland’s doorstep while also enabling the Quandamooka People to be directly involved in the island’s management. The partnership between the Quandamooka People and the Queensland Government will allow the island’s natural and cultural values to be showcased in a culturally sensitive way, delivering ecotourism opportunities and experiences from a First Nations perspective. We look forward to continuing our learning journey by listening to the knowledge of the Quandamooka People.

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