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Beginners Guide to Snorkelling

By Activities, Blog No Comments

Beginners Guide to Snorkelling

Activities

Snorkelling at the Tangalooma Wrecks at Moreton Island (Mulgumpin) is the highlight of your See Moreton Tour. The decades-old shipwrecks provide a beautiful and unique location to visit and explore in South East Queensland.
We asked our passionate snorkel guides to share their best tips for avoiding common snorkelling mistakes and having the best time possible.

Goggles and snorkels and masks, oh my!

Familiarise yourself with the snorkelling equipment you’ll be kitted out with at the Tangalooma Wrecks. The crew will have a thorough safety brief with every group before we reach Moreton Island. This gives you time to ask questions and learn all you need to know about the Tangalooma Wrecks snorkel site.

Essential snorkelling gear includes:

Snorkel Goggle/Mask

It takes a little bit to get used to a snorkel mask. You will be given a mask as we cruise to Moreton Island, and our friendly crew will help you fit it properly. It is best to get accustomed to your mask before you head out to the Tangalooma Wrecks, so you are ready to jump in without any concern about your mask falling off or feeling too tight.

Snorkel

What is snorkelling without a snorkel! This piece of equipment is fitted into your mouth and enables you to breathe underwater.

Swim Fins

Fins are a fun necessity when you snorkel. They help you swim faster and conserve energy during your underwater adventure.

Protective Glove

The Tangalooma Wrecks are over 40 years old and, over time, have become fragile to the touch. We supply protective gloves to help you safely push off the wrecks to avoid the risk of cuts or gashes.

Our professional snorkelling guides will help answer all your snorkel questions.

Lead the way!

Every tour will have two experienced snorkel guides to offer the most exciting and comfortable snorkelling experience.

If you aren’t the most confident swimmer, don’t worry, we have plenty of ways to help you enjoy your time at the Tangalooma Wrecks.

We have different types of floatation devices available to use, including life jackets and pool noodles. The pool noodle is a crew favourite as it helps you glide across the water without using too much energy.

What the fog?

One of the most common issues that happen when snorkelling is when your mask fogs up.

To defog your mask, come up for air and either tread water or find a guide (who will be swimming with a lifebuoy) to hold onto. Take the mask off and use your saliva on the glasses. Rinse off with the ocean water and avoid breathing on it as you put the mask back on.

Breath in, breath out

Snorkels can appear daunting for those who haven’t used them before. Remember always to keep the top of the snorkel afloat, and if you accidentally breathe in the water, don’t panic! Simply blow it out, a bit like how dolphins and whales exhale water from their blowhole!

Capture Memories

Although you can’t touch the coral or wildlife, you can capture the memories of the experience and vibrant environment with an underwater camera. We have all-day GoPro hire available on board which includes a take-home SD card.

*GoPro hire is an additional cost of $50

Be the envy of all your friends with awesome underwater footage using our GoPros!

No touching!

A key thing to remember when snorkelling is NOT to touch anything. As mentioned above, the Tangalooma Wrecks and the ecosystem within it are very fragile. Not only can coral be incredibly sharp, but it is also very delicate and essential for the survival of the marine life that calls it home. Coral grows at an incredibly slow average rate of 0.5-1 inch of growth a year.

You can enjoy the reef and the vibrant wildlife without touching it, protecting it for future generations to come.

Test out your snorkelling skills and see the beautiful Tangalooma Wrecks for yourself.

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The Best Destination in Queensland 2021

By Blog, The Island No Comments

The Best Destination in Queensland 2021

The Island

The question of the year: “What are we going to do this summer?”
With pins put into international holiday plans, you’re probably wondering: “where else can I go that feels as if I’ve flown to Bali without leaving the country?” We have the answer for you: The stunning Moreton Island (Mulgumpin). Pristine waters and stretches of golden beaches, world-class snorkelling, and abundant wildlife create the picturesque Moreton Island.

 

Here’s why a See Moreton Dolphin & Tangalooma Wrecks cruise, only 70 minutes from Brisbane, is the perfect gateway to paradise.

Location, location

A local’s secret, Moreton Island is a unique holiday destination to 40km from the coast of Brisbane.


Begin your Queensland Holiday in the capital of the sunshine state, Brisbane. The heart of SEQ gives easy access to taste all slices of Australian paradise, from the Gold Coast and its national parks to the golden beaches of the Sunshine Coast.

You can board our luxurious catamaran, Spirit of Migaloo II, from Rivergate Marina in Brisbane and enjoy a sub-tropical day out. Being a day trip, you can enjoy a full day of island adventures and return to your accommodation by dinnertime.

Divine weather and turquoise water

Picture a beautiful tropical island with golden beaches crystal clear waters. You won’t have to imagine anymore when you visit Moreton Island. A See Moreton day trip includes snorkelling and swimming in turquoise water, abundant with coral and marine life.

The average temperature on Moreton Island over the summer is 28°C, and over 90% of days are full of beautiful sunshine.  The water temperature can reach up to a refreshing 28°C.

The Tangalooma Wrecks against stunning turquoise water.

World-Class Snorkeling

There aren’t any snorkel sites in Brisbane, but only 70 minutes from the city is a passage to paradise. Snorkelling the world-class Tangalooma Wrecks is a highlight on your See Moreton tour. Discover schools of rainbow fish, turtles, dugongs and colourful coral.

Your ticket includes all that you need to snorkel: Your mask, snorkel, gloves and fins (flippers). Our professional snorkel guides will be there to guide you and help you find the best places in the reef to spot wildlife. Snorkelling is open to all swimming abilities, with floatation devices and safety procedures in place.

Please note: Snorkeling at the Tangalooma Wrecks is recommended for children aged 6 and up. Younger children are welcome to snorkel under competent adult supervision during free beach time.

The mysterious Tangalooma Wrecks (Image courtesy Shutterstock)

Tropical Buffet Delights

We have collaborated with the best local producers in the Gold Coast and Brisbane region to carefully craft a delicious tropical buffet lunch. Indulge in fresh king prawns, maple-glazed ham, tender roast chicken and a delightful assortment of sides.

In the afternoon, cool down with a tropical fruit platter and refreshing happy hour deals.

Dolphins and Turtles and Dugongs, oh my!

Moreton Island (Mulgumpin) boasts one of the largest dolphin populations in the world, consisting of over 700 Indo-Pacific bottlenose dolphins and 200 Australian humpback dolphins. Dolphins are commonly found surfing at the bow of our vessel.

Our cruise will take you on a wildlife discovery tour as we look for shadows in the water that could be a sea turtle or even our favourite local dugong, Dougie.

Dolphin watching on our Moreton Island (Mulgumpin) Cruise

Perfect for everyone

See Moreton Dolphin & Tangalooma Wrecks cruise is the ideal day trip from Brisbane. It is perfect for families young and old, couples who want a romantic getaway or social groups looking for something unique.

Grab your bestie and enjoy fun in the Moreton Island (Mulgumpin) sun.

See Moreton 2021/2022 seasons begins in November. Be the first to visit the island.

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5 rules to keep in mind to practice sustainable tourism

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5 rules to keep in mind to practice sustainable tourism

Responsible Tourism

It is easier than you think to be a responsible and eco-friendly tourist. You don’t need to book a wind-powered cabin or eat strictly organic produce. It is easy to do small actions that help produce a positive and sustainable future for the place you are visiting.

What is sustainable tourism?

Like responsible tourism, sustainable tourism relies on the premise of taking care of the environment, society, and economy. Sustainable tourism principles intend to minimixe the negative impacts of tourism whilst maximixing the positive effects.

Before we continue, See Moreton would like to respectfully acknowledge the people of Quandamooka and their continued care and ownership of the islands and their surroundings. We, at See Moreton, would like to pay respect to their Elders past, present, and emerging. We encourage you to do the same when participating in our sustainable, informative, and breathtaking tours of the Quandamooka Coast.

Reef-friendly slip, slop, slap!

Did you know that most sunscreens contain Oxybenzone and Octinoxate, two ingredients that are harmful to our oceans? Scientists have recorded that up to 6,000 tons of sunscreen are washed into coral reefs around the world each year, advancing the coral bleaching process and killing marine ecosystems.

When choosing a reef-friendly sunscreen, look out for mineral sunscreens with zinc oxide and titanium dioxide, avoiding anything with parabens or in an aerosol can.

Reduce, reuse, recycle

Disposing of waste in the correct bin is an important practise that can be done every day. Our vessel Spirit of Migaloo II has recently installed three brightly coloured recycling bins for general waste, food scraps and recycling. Sorting rubbish into the right bin means that it is going to the right places and not straight into a landfill. Food waste is excellent for composting and giving nutrients to the soil.

Marine life, such as turtles, mistake plastic in the ocean as a source of food. Be careful not to throw your rubbish overboard!

Do not disturb

It is a good practice to be mindful when you travel to new destinations. Moreton Island (Mulgumpin) and the Tangalooma Wrecks are beautiful locations in South-East Queensland however they are a national park and should be treated with care. When you are snorkeling, avoid touching any wildlife or their coral homes. They are part of an ecosystem and any damage or interference can disturb the natural order and put their survival at risk. The reefs and their inhabitants are just as beautiful, even if you can’t feel them.

When snorkeling, avoid leaning or resting on coral (it’s delicate).

Don’t throw waste overboard – keep it with you!

As the famous saying goes, ‘”take only memories, leave nothing but footprints”. Just as you wouldn’t like someone visiting your house and leaving it trashed, take back anything you brought with you to your destination. Any trash or non-perishable items you accumulate can be either disposed of correctly or put into your bag or pocket for later.

Do your part in helping the environment by picking up and removing any rubbish you find, leaving the location better than when you found it.

Respecting culture and heritage

Sustainable tourism is not only just about the environment but is a way to respect and maintain cultural values, diversity, and heritage for the location. At See Moreton, we acknowledge the original owners of Moreton Island (Mulgumpin), the Quandamooka people, by saying the Acknowledgement of Country on every tour and using indigenous words during onboard commentary.

Ecotourism Australia Certification

Choose tour companies with an Ecotourism certification. ECO Certification is the oldest national ecotourism accreditation initiative in the world. It is a program developed by Ecotourism Australia, which is a world-renowned non-profit organization dedicated to environmentally and culturally responsible tourism. Their mission is to encourage nature and wildlife tourism businesses to be sustainable and environmentally friendly, just like See Moreton. This helps consumers know that they are making a better choice for the environment when deciding on their holiday activities. 

We hope this helps you be a more proactive and responsible traveler. Remember, one small act like picking up a piece of rubbish can make a huge difference.

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How did the Tangalooma Wrecks get to Moreton Island?

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How did the Tangalooma Wrecks get to Moreton Island?

The Island

Hidden off the Brisbane coast lies South East Queensland’s best-kept secret: Moreton Island (Mulgumpin) and the Tangalooma Wrecks. Boasting crystal clear water, pristine beaches, and an abundance of wildlife, it is one must-do on your bucket list. Home of the Tangalooma Wrecks, a group of purposely sunk ships, is one of the best snorkeling sites in Australia and the world.

Find out below how the Tangalooma Wrecks got to Moreton Island and answers to other need-to-know questions.

How did the Tangalooma Wrecks get to Moreton Island?

Are they World War II ruins? Are they old pirate ships? Did they all sink at the same time? Good questions, but not quite. The history of the Tangalooma Wrecks dates back to the 1960s when boat owners asked for safe anchorage on the island as small boats found it difficult to dock. Their request for a man-made harbour was granted in the form of the Tangalooma Wrecks. Fifteen vessels were deliberately sunk over the next two decades. Over time the shipwrecks have rusted into the skeletons of ships protruding from the turquoise water. The unique formation has become a popular tourist attraction.

Did you know that each shipwreck has a name of its own?

Where does the name Tangalooma Wrecks come from?

The formation originates from the Quandamooka language for ‘where fish gather’. Quandamooka is the name of the Traditional Custodians of the land and sea surrounding Minjerribah (North Stradbroke Island) and Mulgumpin (Moreton Island). Tangalooma Wrecks is a fitting name for the abundance of fish and wildlife that call the island home.

Elaborate coral formations have formed on the wrecks over the decades, creating an underwater wonderland.

How can I visit the Tangalooma Wrecks?

One of the best ways to visit the Tangalooma Wrecks is See Moreton’s Dolphin & Tangalooma Wrecks Cruise! Our all-inclusive tour departs from Brisbane daily between November and May.

Departing from Brisbane, you will board our multi-million dollar vessel, Spirit of Migaloo II,  taking you on a 70-minute journey to Moreton Island. From here, our expert snorkel guides will lead you through the Tangalooma Wrecks, sharing their knowledge and secret turtle hiding spots. The ticket price includes all snorkel hire, a delicious tropical buffet lunch with fresh ocean king prawns, succulent roast chicken and maple glazed ham, and a selection of fresh seasonal fruit. Drinks and light refreshments are available for purchase onboard.

I’ve never been snorkeling before. Can I still go?

The best part of the Tangalooma Wrecks is how easy it is to snorkel, and there is no experience needed. Our expert guides will help you the entire way, starting with an in-depth brief on the way to the island. This includes safety hand signals, wearing a snorkel and fins, and everything else in between to make your experience comfortable. For many of our guests, this will be their first-ever snorkeling experience, and we’ll be sure to make it a positive one.

Over 250 fish species are found in the Tangalooma wrecks.

Want to see the iconic Tangalooma Wrecks for yourself? Book your seat and prepare to set sail to paradise.

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Why a day trip to Moreton Island (Mulgumpin) is the perfect family outing

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Why a day trip to Moreton Island (Mulgumpin) is the perfect family outing

Activities

Imagine this… You’re bathed in sunshine on a tranquil island. You’re sipping an ice-cold drink as the little ones keep themselves entertained in the golden sand. Picture yourself snorkelling in pristine, crystal clear water with vibrant fish swimming past you. The kids swim beside you, pointing out the turtle hiding in the seagrass. No bored kids, no bustling shopping centres, just you and your family enjoying paradise above and below the sea. This isn’t a scene from your dreams; tropical bliss is waiting for you just a short boat ride away from Brisbane.

See Moreton’s Dolphin & Tangalooma Wrecks Cruise to Moreton Island (Mulgumpin) is the perfect family outing. Your children won’t be able to wait to share it with their friends at school. We list below the top four reasons why a visit to Moreton Island is a must for you and your family

1. Discover the Mystery of the Tangalooma Wrecks

Snorkelling is the highlight of your See Moreton Dolphin and Tangalooma Wreck tour. It’s the perfect family activity as you explore the hidden world beneath pristine waters. Help find a variety of colourful fish, vibrant corals and if you’re lucky, spot a turtle or two! Suitable for first-timers, our professional snorkel guides are with you every step of the way. They are more than happy to help your children learn how to use a snorkel and fins. By the end of their adventure, they’ll be water experts.

Snorkelling at the Wrecks is recommended for children aged 6 and up. Younger children are welcome to snorkel under competent adult supervision during free beach time. All snorkelling equipment is supplied.

2. Let Us Handle Lunch

The best part of this mini-vacay? We handle lunch with a mouth-watering tropical buffet. Enjoy every moment with your family as you indulge in a chef prepared feast. We offer locally caught, fresh trawler prawns, tender roast chicken, delicious maple-glazed ham off the bone alongside an assortment of salads and sides. To top it all off, with sliced seasonal melons and tropical fruits.

3. A Slice of Sandy Paradise

Now it’s time to put your feet up. Moreton Island boasts beautiful, golden beaches, all of which are yours to enjoy. Do as much or as little as you please. Bask in the sun and cosy up with a good book or build an impressive sandcastle. See Moreton supplies a variety of sports equipment such as beach cricket and beach soccer. There is plenty to keep the kids busy as you relax and live on island time.

4. Putting the Wild in Wildlife

How many kids can put up their hand and say they saw dolphins, turtles, or even dugongs? Moreton Island is home to an abundance of wildlife. Your kids can become part of the crew as we look out for creatures in the water. The best way to find spot wildlife is to look out for shadows; if the shadow is darker than others in the water, there’s a good chance it’s something exciting. Our favourite creature to keep an eye out for is Dougie, the resident dugong who spends most of his time munching on seagrass. He loves popping up to say hello to passengers, so don’t forget to wave!

So what are you waiting for? Throw your swimwear into a bag and embark on an epic family day out at Moreton Island. Book your tickets today!

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Discovering the turtles of Moreton Island

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Discovering the turtles of Moreton Island

Wildlife

The Moreton Bay region is one of the few places in the world where turtles can be found so close to a major city. Five species of sea turtle can be spotted year-round, including green, loggerhead, flatback, Pacific ridley and hawksbill turtle.

Who’s Who Of The Sea

Green Turtle chelonia mydas

Distinguishing features: Large, teardrop-shaped shell which comes in a variety of colours including black, brown, yellow and olive.

Loggerhead Turtle caretta caretta

Distinguishing features: Large reddish-brown shell and a short, oversized log-like head.

Flatback Turtle natator depressus

Distinguishing features: Sleek, pale grey-green, flat shell.

Hawksbill Turtle eretmochelys imbricata

Distinguishing features: Narrow pointed beak with a unique tortoiseshell coloured shell pattern that creates a serrated edge towards the back.

Olive ridley turtle (Pacific ridley) lepidochelys olivacea

Distinguishing features: Broad, olive-green shell with an oversized head.

From sand to sea, and back again.

Queensland boasts one of the largest populations of sea turtles in the world. During November-March, turtles return to their birthplace to breed. Female turtles make their way onto the shore and create up to seven nests of eggs underneath the sand. The summer heat warms the temperature of the sand and predicts the gender of the hatchlings; cooler for males and warmer for females. The eggs incubate for up to eight weeks before they hatch and the baby turtles begin their journey into the ocean.

Sadly, you won’t see any turtle babies on your Moreton Island tour; however, there is a high chance you will spot a turtle or two as they explore the coral reefs of the Tangalooma Wrecks. Many of the turtles you will see are in their teenage years.

The ancient mariners of the sea

Turtles have wandered the ocean for more than 120 million years and have earned the nickname of ‘Ancient Mariner’ rightly so. The average lifespan of a sea turtle is between 50-80 years old, with some known to live up to 100 years old.

Scientists are still unsure of the journey of the sea turtle and where they adventure during their time in the ocean. Turtles won’t come to land until they reach the breeding age of 30. From this age, they return to their birthplace to lay their eggs. In a vast ocean, how do they know where their original home is? During their time in the nest, hatchlings develop a form of GPS to which they use to find their way home.

A smorgasbord of jellyfish and seagrass

Sea turtles eat an array of underwater cuisine, all depending on the shape of their beak. Green turtles’ serrated beak makes it easy to munch through seagrass and jellyfish, whereas loggerhead turtles have a strong, curved beak which allows them to crunch on crabs and sea urchins. Hawksbill turtles, like their name, have a bird-like beak which helps them pick at sponge growing in coral reefs. Turtles have a razor-sharp sense of smell which allows them to locate food in murky water.

Three for the sea

Unfortunately, over the next few decades, sea turtles are at risk of becoming endangered or extinct. Pollution and litter are significant threats to their livelihood, as turtles cannot tell the difference between jellyfish and plastic bags floating in the ocean. Scientists have predicted that the loggerhead turtle may become extinct in forty years based on their rapidly declining population numbers.

Our favourite motto our crew lives by is ‘Take Three For The Sea‘. Rubbish on our streets ends up in waterways that eventually run out into the ocean. The piece of trash you walk past on your daily commute, if left, will end up in the sea and potentially risk the life of its inhabitants. You can help stop the pollution in our oceans by picking up three pieces of rubbish each day. If everyone on Earth picked up even one piece of litter a day, that would equate to 27.1 billion pieces saved from the sea each year. A little can go a long way.

Hawksbill Turtle: Fotosearch/Fotosearch/Getty Images

Want to see these ancient creatures for yourself? Purchase your ticket for a See Moreton Dolphin and Tangalooma Wrecks Tour.

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Dolphins at Moreton Island (Mulgumpin)

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Dolphins at Moreton Island (Mulgumpin)

Wildlife

Moreton Island (Mulgumpin) is a nature lover’s dream destination. Not only does it boast sparkling, turquoise waters, but is home to an abundance of wildlife. Various species of turtles, dugongs, and fish can be discovered all around the island. One of the most common and popular marine life you will find is the dolphin. With a bountiful population of over 700 individuals in the region, it marks one of the largest groupings of the curious mammal in the world.

Why do dolphins love Moreton Island?

Moreton Bay Marine Park consists of protected waters, meaning it is a safe space for dolphin populations to thrive. Dolphins breed throughout the year and usually give birth in late summer. Keep an eye out for baby dolphins or ‘calves’ on your tour.

What dolphins will I see?

Two dolphin species call the waters of Moreton Island home; the Australian humpback dolphin and the Indo-Pacific bottlenose dolphin. You are most likely to see the bottlenose dolphin on your tour, distinguished by its dark grey, sleek body and a curved dorsal fin that sits at the centre of its back. Australian humpback dolphins are less common, but not unlikely, to find on your tour. They are identifiable by their humped back, light grey body, and long beak.

Dolphins and people

Bottlenose dolphins love people and can be found swimming between the boats and may even say hello during your snorkelling experience. The Bay has been an important and historical site for dolphins and local Aboriginal groups such as the Quandamooka People. The first nations people would call the dolphins from the sea by clicking their boomerangs and spears. The dolphins would herd the fish into the shore, allowing the people to hunt what they needed, leaving the rest for the dolphins.

Did you know that the Quandamooka word for dolphin is ‘Buwangan’?

Australian humpback dolphin

Sousa sahulensis

Colour: Light grey on their upper-dorsal and white underbelly

Size: Grow up to 2.7m in length and weigh up to 200kg.

Moreton Island population: Less than 200

Distinguishing features: Hump on their back where a small dorsal fin sits. Long beak that protrudes out of the water.

Diet: Opportunistic feeders that feed close to the ocean floor. Prey on fish and have been seen to follow trawler boats.

Location: Found in the northern waters of Australia beginning at the NSW-QLD border.

There are less than 200 Australian humpback dolphins in the Moreton Bay region, representing one of the largest congregations in the world. Despite the high numbers at Moreton Island, they are listed as a vulnerable species. The area around the Port of Brisbane is part of their core habitat, and you will often see them at the mouth of the Brisbane river on your departure and/or arrival.

The Australian Humpback Dolphin is a shy species, keeping to itself rather than interacting with humans. They love to play with seaweed, shells, jellyfish, along with each other.

Indo-Pacific bottlenose dolphin

Tursiops aduncus

Colour: Dark grey on the upper-dorsal side and light grey to white on their underbelly

Size: Grow up to 2.5m in length and weigh up to 250kg.

Moreton Island population: 700

Distinguishing features: Sleek body, short beak, and curved dorsal fin.

Diet: Fish, octopus, squid, crustaceans, and small rays. Often seen following trawler boats.

Location: Found all over Australia

Bottlenose dolphins are very social creatures and have been seen in pods of up to 100 individuals. Moreton Bay is home to approximately 700 bottlenose dolphins, making them the most common species you will see on your See Moreton tour. Females travel with other females in pods of up to 20 individuals, whereas males tend to stick close together with at least four other males.

The Moreton Bay bottlenose dolphin population is divided into two groupings: Non-trawler dolphins that are found close to shore in shallow water, hanging around seagrass meadows; and trawler dolphins are found farther from shore, hanging around trawler boats chasing the daily catch.

Did you know that the different pods of bottlenose dolphins at Moreton Island tend to only interact and bond with dolphins who have the same foraging techniques as each other? You won’t see non-trawler dolphins mingling with trawler dolphins.

Bottlenose dolphins are known for their curious personalities and playful behavior such as leaping, surfing, and tail slapping. Keep an eye out on the front of the boat as they love to ride the bow!

Now you know everything there is about our beloved Moreton Island dolphins, it’s time to see them for yourself. We see dolphins on 92% of our tours. Book your See Moreton Dolphin and Tangalooma Wrecks tour today!

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Paradise in your backyard: 6 reasons why Moreton Island should be your next tropical escape

By The Island No Comments

Paradise in your backyard: 6 reasons why Moreton Island should be your next tropical escape

The Island

Many of our summer travel plans have been disrupted and cancelled this year. No Bali, no Europe, stuck at home with travel money to spare. Where do you go now? Moreton Island is the perfect place to satisfy your wanderlust cravings.

With state borders now open, it is time to discover the hidden wonders and beauty of Australia. Escape the hustle and bustle of the city and experience the idyllic Moreton Island, paradise only 75 minutes away from Brisbane. Drift away to turquoise waters and unspoilt beaches, sand dunes, dolphins and so much more. You’ll be the height of island envy amongst your friends.

6 Reasons Why Moreton Island Should Be Your Next Tropical Escape

1. Perfect for the budget-conscious

Only 75 minutes from Brisbane, Moreton Island is every budget traveller’s dream. No flights, excess baggage fees, hotel stays, just you and your ticket headed for paradise. Your tour includes all that you need, from snorkel hire to a buffet lunch. All you need to worry about is choosing which of your dozens of photographs is Insta-worthy.

Caption for image

2. Feel a world away in a day

A visit to Moreton Island is the day-trip detox you need. Let your worries disappear and bathe in the summer sunshine as you are whisked away from city life. The replacement of concrete skylines for crystal clear waters will make you forget that reality is just over an hour away. Pick up and drop off options are available, allowing you to relax and enjoy paradise stress-free, just how it should be.

3. A nature lovers dream

Moreton Bay is a marine wildlife mecca that needs to be seen to be believed. The region is home to the largest group of resident bottlenose dolphins in the world as well as the rare Australian humpback dolphin. Where else can you get up close with schools of fish, sea turtles and even shy and gentle dugongs? Keep an eye out for the bottlenose dolphins who also love to ride the bow on the cruise over to Moreton Island.

4. Discover the mystery of the Tangalooma Wrecks

Moreton Island is home to the unique the Tangalooma Wrecks, a fleet of purposely sunken boats that over time have become home to a vibrant coral reef. Snorkel your way through colourful schools of fish and keep your eyes open for turtles, wobbegongs and everyone’s favourite local, Dougie, the dugong. We have trained snorkel guides that know the wrecks inside and out, and are happy to share their favourite spots and secrets of the Tangalooma Wrecks. (All snorkel gear is included in your ticket price).

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 5. Explore on Moreton Island time

We’re all about freedom and flexibility, so do as much or do as little as you like during your free island time. Explore stretches of unspoiled white sand beaches or unleash your inner adventurer by scrambling up famous dunes to capture a view worthy of Instagram envy. Pop up an umbrella and unwind under with a good book or tanning session. Challenge your friends to a game of beach footy with supplied sports equipment.

6. Feast on local flavours

When all that adventuring works up an appetite, we’ve got you covered with a Tropical Buffet Lunch (included in your ticket price). Soak up the sunshine as you devour a chef-prepared lunch including ocean king prawns, succulent chicken, maple-glazed ham, salads, bread rolls and servings of sweet, tropical fruits. Nothing says an island getaway more than pairing lunch with an ice-cold beverage or frozen cocktail from the onboard bar and some summer tunes (available to purchase onboard).

Visit Moreton Island for yourself and discover paradise in your backyard.
BOOK YOUR TICKETS NOW

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8 fun facts about Moreton Island

By The Island No Comments

8 fun facts about Moreton Island

The Island

Moreton Island is known as the gem of South East Queensland. And the Gold Coast and Brisbane are lucky to have it right on their doorsteps! Moreton Island is one of Australia’s largest sand islands, making Moreton Island a unique and memorable getaway destination. The Island is almost completely sand with no roads, so to get further than walking distance from the ferry landing points, you’ll need a 4WD. Just across the bay from the city, Moreton Island is quickly being recognised as an unspoiled and pristine paradise for people wanting to explore nature. Here we offer 10 fun facts about Moreton Island that you might not already know!

1. Moreton Island’s traditional, Aboriginal name is Mulgumpin (also spelt Moorgumpin). This island has recently been reclaimed by the Quandamooka People who speak the Jandai language. The Quandamooka People are the rightful owners of the island, so try saying Moor-gum-pin when you visit!

 

2. Moreton Island is the third largest sand island in the world. It is a 37km long, 10km wide, wedge-shaped island located only 40km northeast of Brisbane. The island consists almost entirely of sand. The exception being a small area of sandstone and rhyolite at Cape Moreton, which has built up over the past 400,000 years!

 

3. Moreton Island is home to the highest coastal sand dune in the world! Mount Tempest reaches 285 metres high and provides 360 degrees of breath-taking views. The island is also the only area where Pleistocene dunes have been naturally destabilised and being actively reworked. Examples of this can be seen at The Desert south of Tangalooma and the Big and Little Sandhills.

 

4. Moreton Island is one of the least polluted and least disturbed coastal environments along the Queensland and New South Wales coast. The island has one of the most outstanding records of continuing geological and biological processes on sand island masses in South East Queensland. Natural dune processes of erosion (gradual deterioration), accretion (gradual growth) and stabilisation by vegetation have remained relatively undisturbed by human activities.

 

5. Moreton Island is restricted to 4WD access only. This is because all roads on the island are sand! And the inland tracks can be extremely soft. Bogging is quite common in these areas – don’t say we didn’t warn you!

 

6. The sheltered waters of Moreton Bay are home to many different marine animals. Especially wonderful are the resident dugongs, who feed on the diverse seagrass communities surrounding the island. You are also likely to see dolphins and migratory birds. In particular, the island is an important feeding and resting point for over 50,000 migratory waders!

 

7. The island has been deemed the jewel of Moreton Bay, receiving more than 170,000 visitors per year! This means it is more important than ever that we tread lightly, reduce our waste and show care towards the local plants, animals and ecosystems. Many visitors stay at the famous Tangalooma Island Resort, while others choose to camp. Camping permits can be booked through Mulgumpin Camping, owned and operated by the Quandamooka Yoolooburrabee Aboriginal Corporation (QYAC).

 

8. The island’s shape is always changing in response to the ocean currents and winds. The development of the Mirapool lagoon – from a series of islands to its current form as a large body of shallow water – is a good example of how quickly the sand environment can change.

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What to bring and wear on our Dolphin and Tangalooma Wrecks Cruise

By Activities No Comments

What to bring and wear on our Dolphin and Tangalooma Wrecks Cruise

Thinking about taking a journey with us to explore the crystal-clear waters of Moreton Bay? Or better yet, have you already booked your cruise? See Moreton offers unique experiences all about flexibility and freedom. We invite you to choose the pace of your day. Want a deeply relaxing day on the water? Done! Or would you prefer a highly active and energetic adventure? It is totally up to you! Just keep reading to find out what you should bring along to your full-day tour with See Moreton. A little preparation makes all the difference.

1. Jacket

No matter the season, it is important to wear a windproof and waterproof jacket when you join us for our Dolphin and Tangalooma Wrecks Cruise. While the sea breeze is refreshing, it can also be a bit cold. In winter, it may be a good idea to wear a beanie and/or scarf too. Remember, you can always take them off, but you cannot wear what you don’t bring! You’ll thank us later.

2. Sunglasses

Sunglasses are a must when you join us on the water. That ocean glare can be intense on both sunny and overcast days. Ensure they have UV protection, and bonus points if they are polarised! Polarised sunnies will really help you see past the glare on the water’s surface. You may even be able to spot some fish swimming below!

3. Sunscreen and a hat

Don’t be fooled by the chilly wind. You are still susceptible to sunburn on our day trip. Make sure you slip, slop, slap with some SPF 30 or 50+, and wear a hat. But be careful – ensure your hat has a drawstring, or hold on tight! Don’t say we didn’t warn you.

4. Swimsuit, boardshorts and a towel

If you’re planning on diving into the heavenly water of Moreton Bay and having a snorkel, it is vital you bring your swimmers and a towel. Trust us – you do not want to have to air dry once you are back on the boat. Remember, that ocean breeze gets chilly! We understand that snorkeling may not be for everyone, so if you don’t plan on taking the plunge you can leave this item off your checklist.

5. Sea sickness tablets

Hopefully you won’t need these, but it’s better to be safe than sorry. A short trip to the pharmacy before you jump on board can save a lot of pain and discomfort later on. Most sea sickness tablets can be purchased over the counter, but make sure you read the packet as they can make some people feel drowsy.

6. Camera (or smartphone)

Last but certainly not least, your trusty camera! Ensure your camera, or other photo-taking device, is fully charged (or bring some spare batteries). Consider sprucing up your camera with a wrist or neck strap. This will help prevent a tragic camera-gone-overboard situation. It also means you will have your hands free to hold onto the rails. Safety first, remember!

But most importantly, bring your happy energies and beautiful smiles! While our crew will be providing this in abundance, bringing your own is guaranteed to level up your day. We, at See Moreton, look forward to showing you the magic of Moreton Bay very soon.

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